The Newton brothers (Willis, Jesse, Joe and Willie) during thier trial for their involvement in the great Rondout train robbery. All would be convict receiving rather light sentences considering they stole from the Postal Service and made off with about $3 million (figure is in 1924 currency).
After the robbery, they all were apprehended rather quickly. Willis (on the left) actually made it to Mexico and was lured back to the US by an undercover agent. The agent told Willis there was a rodeo in Texas where Willis could show off his skills. Willis was arrested in a gaudy western outfit that he proudly wore all the way back to Illinois for trial.  

The Newton brothers (Willis, Jesse, Joe and Willie) during thier trial for their involvement in the great Rondout train robbery. All would be convict receiving rather light sentences considering they stole from the Postal Service and made off with about $3 million (figure is in 1924 currency).

After the robbery, they all were apprehended rather quickly. Willis (on the left) actually made it to Mexico and was lured back to the US by an undercover agent. The agent told Willis there was a rodeo in Texas where Willis could show off his skills. Willis was arrested in a gaudy western outfit that he proudly wore all the way back to Illinois for trial.  

Enjoy this view of a festive summer day in downtown Libertyville with cars parked along Milwaukee Avenue. The banners hanging overhead announce that the Chautauqua is in town. In 1921 the Redpath Chautauqua came to Libertyville from July 20th to the 25th and featured musical entertainment, drama and lectures. Some of the attractions included Dunbar’s White Hussars (a band and male chorus), Grobecker’s Swiss Yodlers, Gretchen Cox and Company (a well-known violinist) and the comedy “Nothing But the Truth.” Langworthy’s Ice Cream shop and the Lake County National Bank can be seen on the west side of the street.

Enjoy this view of a festive summer day in downtown Libertyville with cars parked along Milwaukee Avenue. The banners hanging overhead announce that the Chautauqua is in town. In 1921 the Redpath Chautauqua came to Libertyville from July 20th to the 25th and featured musical entertainment, drama and lectures. Some of the attractions included Dunbar’s White Hussars (a band and male chorus), Grobecker’s Swiss Yodlers, Gretchen Cox and Company (a well-known violinist) and the comedy “Nothing But the Truth.” Langworthy’s Ice Cream shop and the Lake County National Bank can be seen on the west side of the street.

Advertisement from L.A. Walker appearing in the Lake County Independent in June 1918.

Advertisement from L.A. Walker appearing in the Lake County Independent in June 1918.

One of the automobiles involved in the Rondout train robbery in June of 1924. The photograph was taken in front of the Chicago Detective Bureau during the investigation into the robbery. This car in particular was one that the robbers placed the mail bags into to make their getaway. Be sure to check out the upcoming posting on the library’s Local History Page: Libertyville’s Past is Present.

One of the automobiles involved in the Rondout train robbery in June of 1924. The photograph was taken in front of the Chicago Detective Bureau during the investigation into the robbery. This car in particular was one that the robbers placed the mail bags into to make their getaway. Be sure to check out the upcoming posting on the library’s Local History Page: Libertyville’s Past is Present.

On June 12, 1924, a gang of robbers made off with roughly $3 million (in 1924 currency) cash, bonds and other valuables from a train near local Rondout. The above picture shows one of the cars that the bandits tossed tear gas canisters through to get postal employees to open the doors of the car.
Coming Soon: Blog post covering the robbery on Cook Memorial’s local history blog: Libertyville’s Past is Present!

On June 12, 1924, a gang of robbers made off with roughly $3 million (in 1924 currency) cash, bonds and other valuables from a train near local Rondout. The above picture shows one of the cars that the bandits tossed tear gas canisters through to get postal employees to open the doors of the car.

Coming Soon: Blog post covering the robbery on Cook Memorial’s local history blog: Libertyville’s Past is Present!